My Month in a Mexican Village

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and in 32 days, my eyes had much to behold………

Sweetheart

Every day is Valentine's Day
Every day is Valentine’s Day
Sunset from the Bedroom
Sunset from the Bedroom

After spending many years at the Fantasyland that is the 5-star resort, I decided to experience the “real” Mexico.  Just moments away from the Malacon and tourist traps, lies a far more beguiling culture where everything is not so spick-n-span, or clichéd.  Ensconced in a small fishing village, I learned so much more about Latin- Mexican culture than I ever dreamed.  Where was all the danger the media so voraciously promotes?  I never felt unsafe or unsure, but instead enfolded within the arms of a loving community of both natives and ‘gringo’ ex-pats.  I wandered day or night, alone (former), or in a group,(latter), and never encountered anything but helpful, considerate people who were very patient with my faltering Espanol, and eager to embrace the joys of daily life together.

Many mornings were spent meditating and walking along the shore, and chatting with the fisherman pulling their catch of the day.  No commercial fishing boats here.  Lines were laid by night, and gathered in by muscle-power, supplied by two fisherman at each end of the net.  The choicest specimens were hand-picked from the net (no easy task) and hucked into milk crates.  Now that is fresh……….  Likewise for the oyster divers, right in front of my home.  Tied to tires, with nothing but flippers and chisels, they would dive endlessly, to bring forth fresh fruits of the sea.  This is as commercial as it gets.  After a sunrise meditation, I would head home for breakfast, my table open to the tree-line, and listen to the birds serenade me while I ate.  Most Mexican homes do not have screens and these little charmers were mere meters away, but respected my boundaries by not trying to share my morning meal.  Time to mosey into town for a latte at Vera’s Café and then to abrokenart.com to work on a tile mosaic of what else?  Flowers of course!

theyardtherapist learns to cut and make tile mosaic flowers
theyardtherapist learns to cut and make tile mosaic flowers
Oyster Divers
Oyster Divers
Singin"

Singin”

On any given day, I would take the time to really look and document all the truly beautiful details that constituted our little village.  I was humbled, and inspired by the use of whatever material that was available to create walls, squares, and shady little paths and secret gardens.  Chickens roam at will, and behind crumbling walls and storefronts marvels were hiding, like this courtyard within the tiny façade of Gringa’s Bookshop and Café, the only place within kilometers to find books in English print..

Local Stonework
Local Stonework
Squared
Squared

 

Hidden Courtyard
Bouganvillia and.....Chickens Bougainvilla and…..Chickens

On to agriculture………farm to table is not a concept, it is a way of life here.  Although it took extra effort, (all fruits and vege needed to be treated) and lugging in bottled fresh water to cook, it was well worth it!  The food is just picked, plucked, or caught daily, and the flavors were sublime.  This is no exaggeration. I have been ruined for the trucked in, 4 month old fruit and vege we buy at the store.  Mi amigas and myself would just amble to the outdoor market or farm truck for the day’s needs.  I was able to take a local cooking course at mymexicankitchen.com, and did a more than passable job at reproducing some of the techniques I learned.  I have the waistline to prove it! I took a journey out to my friend Carlos’s family farm and had a first- hand look at what the local farmers, and alas, Monsanto was growing, and how.  The local farmers are just like any organic farmer here, with one exception.  They buy pre-mixed applications of fertilizer from the farm store (Bayer), but really do not know what is in it.  They take it all on trust.  The Monsanto farm was rather . in that every corn plant was tagged, and were exact replicas of one another………..But this is not about Monsanto, and its endless quest for genetic modification, a topic for a later post.   I was surprised to see the river beds, post-corn harvest, were flooded to become rice paddies.  I had no idea that Mexico produced rice as an agricultural crop.  As you can see from the pictures, they are indeed flourishing.  Likewise, the soybean fields across the highway.   Could I envision a life here?  Once back to the bone-chilling winds of the prairies and the struggle to pull on socks and boots, my answer is a resounding YES! Living on such a simple and elemental plane is liberating and healthy.  The things that matter rule, food, shelter, and most importantly, enjoyment of life.  Who you are matters, what you have does not.   What a way to live………

Looks like a banana, it is a banana, but it is called The Traveller's Palm
Looks like a banana, it is a banana, but it is called The Traveller’s Palm
Rice Paddy
Rice Paddy
Soybean farm
Soybean farm
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Published by

natureanalyst

Avid student of horticulture, active volunteer with the Horticultural Society, maker of beautiful garden spaces. I am now available for Garden Design services, custom planters, DIY consultations in Calgary and surrounding areas. Inquire at 403-837-9980 or wnealyo@gmail.com

5 thoughts on “My Month in a Mexican Village”

  1. Enjoyed reading your blog Wanda. Love your pictures. I’m taking some of my favourites to add to my pictures. Thanks for your company. Made our trip all that more enjoyable.

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